Volume 10 Supplement 1

2nd Cross Company Respiratory Symposium

Open Access

Mouse model of HDM induced airway inflammation + influenza or RSV. Effects of steroid

  • Dave Lamb1,
  • Christina Muir1,
  • Debbie Chappell1,
  • Hiroki Mori1,
  • Nicole Parker1,
  • Katy Hulland1,
  • Dominique Westbrook1,
  • Umar Burki1,
  • Jenny Hincks1,
  • Tony White1,
  • Vittorio Spampinato1,
  • Helen Bright1 and
  • Steve Evans1
Journal of Inflammation201310(Suppl 1):P22

https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-9255-10-S1-P22

Published: 14 August 2013

Influenza A virus is one of the most common infectious pathogens. The disease that ensues is particularly serious in certain at risk groups within the population; such as individuals with chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Asthma is an example of a chronic inflammatory disease which is exacerbated by the virus, and infection frequently leads to hospitalization of asthmatic patients. The role of respiratory viruses in development of severe clinical asthma, in particular, is poorly understood. Pfizer has supported the European Union-led IMI UBIOPRED pre-competitive collaboration between academic and pharma partners which aims to better understand the clinical disease, and in doing so, developed pre-clinical models of both severe asthma and asthma exacerbation. We established and characterised RSV and Influenza A infection in the mouse house dust mite (HDM) model.

We have examined the bronchoalveolar fluid (bal) cell and lung cytokine responses as well as observing the health of the animals for a 14 day period following exposure to varying virus doses. Groups of mice were infected with 5 x virus doses and virus replication and inflammatory responses monitored at days 1, 3, 7 and 14 post infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lungs were collected from all mice. BAL was processed for cell counts and tissue was processed for cytokine and pathology. Additionally, mice were observed daily for onset of clinical symptoms and weight loss. We have demonstrated two unique viral exacerbation profiles and demonstrated that influenza can generate an exacerbative profile in conjunction with HDM challenge.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Inflammation and Remodeling Research, Pfizer Cambridge Massachusetts

Copyright

© Lamb et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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